Intensive Advanced 2

Wednesday, June 22, 2016

Advanced 2. Sample writings

As requested by some of you, here is some advice on how to write an article, an essay, etc. together with a collection of sample writings (model questions and answers). I hope you find this link useful. Click here

Monday, May 30, 2016

Advanced 2: Revision (2)

Watch these videos and do the exercises.
Houses and technology. Click here.
Tourism. Click here.
Teenagers and technology. Click here.
Food. Click here.
Sports. Click here.

Friday, May 27, 2016

Advanced 2. Revision

Listen to the recordings and do the quiz activities.
Deforestation. Click here.
Sports. Click here and here.
Travel and animals. Click here.
Owning or renting. Click here.

Monday, May 23, 2016

Advanced 2: Buying or renting property?

Would you rather buy a house or rent it? Watch the following video. Click here.
Glossary:
homeowner: propietario
renter/ tenant: inquilino
landlord / landlady: el casero /casera
monthly rent check: alquiler mensual
a down payment: una señal (a sum paid in advance)
a washer-drier: una lavadora-secadora
equity: patrimonio neto, participación en la propiedad
shag carpeting: alfombra / moqueta de pelo largo
to chip away: socavar
outright. totalmente
lay out a good chunk of change: desembolsar un buen "pellizco"
cost-effective: rentable
to upkeep: mantener

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Advanced 2. Video: Octopus, Galician Style

Here you are. Enjoy!!
Now fill in the blanks with one or two words.

Octopus, Galician style
Some people are creeped out by octopus. I don’t get it. Others worry about eating them because they’re so intelligent, because –after all— they’re more intelligent than dogs. But of course so are pigs, and chickens, and maybe even grapes.
So this preparation is from Galicia, the Northwestern part of Spain. One of the most beautiful places in the world. One of the places with the best seafood in the world and certainly the place in the world that is most obsessed with octopus. The only place I know where there are “pulperías”, octopus restaurants.
Now, you can cook the octopus whole. Just put it in the water like that and that’s what they do in Galicia, but I wanna make it a little more accessible, something that people really enjoy and don’t go ugh ‘cause that drives me nuts.
One thing I do is I take off the little ends of the tentacles. Octopus shrinks a lot when it’s cooking so these wind up looking like little unattractive threads. So we get rid of those first.
It’s kind of like slimy dreadlocks. Anyway, I don´t cook the head either. I do when I’m cooking myself but I don’t for guests ‘cause, like I said, I wanna make this accessible. So, here’s a nice way to deal with this. There’s webbing at the top of each of the legs. Cut up through that, just to the base of the head on either side and then cut right here. This serves eight, right. Octopus. So, again, cut up through that webbing, cut across the top. All right. Here we go.
We have our beautiful trimmed octopus, we have our pot of lively boiling water. We’re gonna salt it quite heavily. (It’ll) be really good if you cook this in sea water. And then, in they go.
Once they’re in, turn the heat down, and I keep the heat low; you just want a slow simmer, 212 degrees. Generally takes an hour to an hour and a half for an octopus to become tender; so we’ll come back in about an hour and take a look at it then.
It’s ready and I’m gonna show you how we know it’s ready. Look how much that’s shrunk. Not much effort to put the point of the knife in there. So, when it gets to that point, take some potatoes, cut them really thick, good half-inch thick.
I’m gonna cook those potatoes chunks about what? 15 minutes, 20 minutes, until they’re good and tender. And that’s the dish. Well, there’s a cool way of serving it, which I’ll show you when we’re ready.
Twenty minutes later, as I promised, the potatoes are done. The octopus is obviously no less done. And here’s a typical Galician serving style. A couple of pieces of “pulpo”, a fair amount of olive oil (good olive oil), a sprinkling of “pimentón” (Spanish smoked paprika), a few grains of coarse salt (“fleur de salt”, flower of the salt).
Why would anyone be afraid of this? Now, that’s eating smart.